Category Archives: Uncategorized

Actions to improve your personal climate

Recovering from Climate Grief

When people think of this beautiful planet threatened by destruction, it is not surprising that hearts fill with sadness. These feelings are painful, but it is possible to learn ways to control and convert those feelings.

Change your attitude: Dismay, yes. Despair, no.

Shariff AbdullahCommonway Institute has provided workshops on global crisis and global solutions for over 30 years. A handful of participants take the challenge each time a workshop is offered, in contrast to the large numbers who sign up for “get rich quick” seminars provided by the guru of the day.

In his November blog article, Commonway’s Shariff Abdullah suggests that there are ways we can shift our focus to enable you to facilitate our coming together to survive and revive our world. The goal of his teachings has always been “a world that works for all”. Spend a little while (or a lot) on his new web site. I hope you will find his ideas inspiring.

article link: https://commonway.org/2019/11/21/are-you-in-climate-change-grief-why/

Make Your Home More Independent

The ideas we have found will move you toward practical goals that will make a difference. Here is a song to hum as you go along. Remember this song whenever you think you can’t do much on your own.

These ideas are a start with practical goals that will make a difference. Here is a song to hum as you go along.

Change the World and Make a Difference

Credit to “I am Bullyproof Music” www.IamBullyproofMusic.org

Goal 1 for your home: Reduce your personal need for “the grid”.

Many laws and rules still act as roadblocks to making a home energy independent. New terminology in use is now aiming for “Zero Dependence”. Small solar and wind chargers produce only small amounts of power, but you may be able to strategically get enough independent juice to charge your devices, to run your PC, or med equip, or even a small refrigerator.

To prepare for coming blackouts and reduce your dependence on grid energy, here are your first steps.

  • Tech devices: Change to battery operated devices for daily use, such as laptop or tablet.
  • Kitchen: Get a small battery or butane refrigerator and cook top.
  • Electricity: Add portable solar power options for travel and home.

    A place to learn about options:
    The Prepared (https://theprepared.com) collects free, osessively-researched reviews of “prepper” gear for emergency home protection. This article reviews portable solar chargers.

    “We reviewed 25 products and spent over 100 hours scientifically field testing the top 15 portable solar panels to find the best ones for modern survival. After considering price, durability, performance, size, and weight, we recommend the Ryno Tuff 21W Portable Solar Charger.”

    https://theprepared.com/gear/reviews/portable-solar-chargers/?utm_source=fb&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=castatewidepowersolar

Goal 2 for your home: Grow and protect your outdoor space

You can protect your home from climate disaster by changing the way you garden. Reduce your need for resources and help wildlife thrive and be protected by the plants you grow. Fire prevention has become a climate change issue as we have seen during the past few years, particularly in California, Oregon and Arizona.

  • Clear defensible space:The first step in preparing and protecting your own home is covered in this article from San Diego County. https://www.sandiegocounty.gov/pds/fire_resistant.html
  • Create a backyard habitat, with advice from National Wildlife Federation.

    The National Wildlife Federation’s Backyard Wildlife Habitat program encourages everyone to manage their gardens and yards, or any outdoor space, whether a tiny balcony or several acres, to offer food, water, shelter, and a place to raise their young to beneficial insects or animals. Learn more here: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backyard_Wildlife_Habitat

    In order to have your garden certified, your space must do all of the following: provide food, water, cover, a place to raise young, and be maintained in a way that has a positive effect on the health of the soil, air, water, and habitat for native wildlife. As of 2006, the program has certified over 60,000 ‘backyards’. Application and details: https://www.nwf.org/gardenforwildlife

eLearning FAQ

If you are new to the idea of using online resources for your main source of learning about a subject, this section is for you.

In order to maximize ability to pull it all together, it helps to know the basics. Online learning is an art form, not just clicking and trying to absorb. Read these answers to some of the questions you may have, then take the “self assessment” quiz. There is also a Glossary at the end of many common terms and acronyms.

Answer these questions to see if online learning is right for you:
Self-Assessment

7 Ways to Save the Planet

Excerpts of seven point “save the planet” outline from Reddit user “m4ybe”:

1) Completely overhaul agriculture
Our agriculture system relies heavily on supplementing soil with … minerals supplemented as a secondary pass. This process destroys the rhizosphere… By enhancing and feeding microbial life in the soil … we can get a greater yield without … rhizospheric holocaust. (Note: rhizosphere is the narrow region of soil that plants depend on for nutrition.)

2) Eliminate any non-recyclable single-use packaging or product
Hemp makes better plastic, which is biodegradable … planting hemp instead of soy and corn would go a long way to fixing the soil…
Any current plastic producer can easily be retrofit to produce plastic with hemp instead of petrochemicals.

3) Make a World War II-style push to seriously address energy production
Thorium-salt based nuclear reactors … through tidal, wind, solar energy …
We also need to research and establish safer, more sustainable ways to store our energy.
[Thorium salt is apparently safer than regular nuclear reactors.]

4) Close any waste loops
From toilets to nuclear waste, methods must be established to convert waste to useful products as opposed to treating it as an afterthought. … These things must become the norm instead of the exception.

5) Utilize known and effective alternative building materials
Cob, Rammed Earth, Adobe, Strawbale, Earth Bag, Aircrete, and others … freely available, sustainable, and vastly reduce the amount of waste produced by building a house.

6) Reduce protein intake, increase sustainable protein production
[Note: the solution offered is not really to reduce vital protein in the diet but to choose sources and methods of growing protein that are less wasteful.]
Our current methods for producing beef, pork, chicken, and fish are all deeply unsustainable. Factory livestock operations produce the pollution equivalent of a city on as little as an acre’s worth of space.
Free range chickens make excellent pest control on polyculture farms. Pigs make excellent manure and function as nature’s garbage disposals. Aquaponics can sustainably grow salmon, trout, jade perch, tilapia, and a number of other fish while SIMULTANEOUSLY growing crops in a density much higher than traditional agriculture.

7) Subsidize and incentivize birth control
The single most effective thing you can do to reduce the human burden placed on the planet is have one less child. By incentivizing birth control universally (the universal aspect is critical), we can reduce the human population. If first world nations were half as populated as they are today, our waste output would plummet…

William McKibben on Getting to 350

McKinney described the problem in his 1989 book The End of Nature (still one of the most influential books on climate):

“We’re like the patient that goes to the doctor and learns he’s overweight, or his cholesterol is too high. He doesn’t die immediately—but until he changes his lifestyle and gets back down to the safe zone, he’s at more risk for heart attack or stroke,” says McKibben. “The planet is in its danger zone because we’ve poured too much carbon into the atmosphere, and we’re starting to see signs of real trouble: melting ice caps, rapidly spreading drought. We need to scramble back as quickly as we can to safety.”

“Scrambling back” requires all nations to transform energy infrastructures, including transportation and power structures, becoming more energy efficient, using solar arrays instead of coal, planting trees instead of cutting down forests, reducing waste.

“Getting to 350 means developing a thousand different solutions—all of which will become much easier if we have a global treaty grounded in the latest science and built around the principles of equity and justice,” the group reports. “To get this kind of treaty, we need a movement of people who care enough about our shared global future to get involved and make their voices heard.”